Pharmacor

March 2010

Acute Pain

Report Authors
Sandra T. Chow, M.Sc.
Ruth Masterson Creber, M.Sc.
Tricia L. Daley
Jonathon H. Loring
  • Pages:191
  • Tables:41
  • Figures:17
  • Citations:96
  • Drugs:195
  • Interviews:63

Introduction:

Few important advances in the treatment of acute pain have been made over the past few decades, so this market is one of numerous low-cost generics competing against a small number of reformulated brands that incorporate conventional analgesics (e.g., opioid analgesics, NSAIDs, local anesthetics) into more-patient-friendly products. Nevertheless, there are niche opportunities for drug developers who can address key areas of unmet need, the most important of which are for potent, opioid-sparing analgesics for postoperative pain and effective analgesics for opioid-refractory severe pain. The sheer size of the acute musculoskeletal pain patient segment also presents opportunity for developers who can offer safe and effective alternatives to oral NSAIDs (the current gold standard for this kind of pain).

Questions Answered in This Report:

  *   Growing use of opioid-sparing analgesics in the postoperative environment will reduce the need for strong opioids in this setting. How will this trend affect overall opioid analgesic sales for acute pain? In which markets will new opioid-sparing analgesics have the greatest impact?

  *   Locally acting transdermal NSAIDs will offer oral NSAID-strength pain relief but with minimal systemic exposure for patients with highly localized pain. How will these new prescription-strength NSAIDs be received by physicians and patients once they reach the market? How will third-party payer reimbursement of these comparatively expensive new NSAIDs affect their uptake?

  *   Thought-leading pain specialists look forward to the introduction of long-acting bupivacaine products for postoperative pain. How will these expensive new products fare once they reach the market? Will lingering concerns about potential toxicity limit these new agents’ uptake in the hospital sector?

  *   Increasingly restrictive Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies (REMS) are being applied to many strong opioids in the United States. How will these restrictions affect drug treatment of acute pain? Which current and emerging agents will be most affected? Which patient sectors will be most affected?

  *   Most triptans will lose patent protection between 2012 and 2015. How will genericization affect uptake of expensive new migraine-specific agents like Merck’s telcagepant? Will the genericization of the triptan market boost PCP/GP prescribing of these agents for migraine?

Scope:

Markets covered: United States, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, United Kingdom, Japan.

Primary research: 63 country-specific interviews with pain specialists and researchers.

Epidemiology: Prevalent cases of breakthrough cancer pain, prevalent cases of migraine and number of migraine attacks, number of incident events of select surgical procedures, prevalent cases of acute musculoskeletal pain (by number of involved sites), prevalent cases of acute low back pain, prevalent cases of acute neck pain.

Emerging therapies: Phase II: 6 drugs; Phase III: 18 drugs; preregistration: 4 drugs.

Market forecast features: We segment key acute pain populations in the base year (2008), segment the base-year market by hospital versus retail acute pain sales, provide market analysis and forecast by drug formulations, and forecast total acute pain drug sales for therapies through 2018.

Alternative market scenarios: Acetaminophen/opioid combination drugs are withdrawn from the U.S. market.


Search Reports

Mentioned in this report:

  • - Abbott Laboratories
  • - AcelRx
  • - Acura Pharmaceuticals
  • - Akela Pharma
  • - Akorn
  • - Alexza Pharmaceuticals
  • - Almirall
  • - Anesiva
  • - APP Pharmaceuticals
  • - Aradigm
  • - Archimedes
  • - Astellas Pharma
  • - AstraZeneca
  • - Barr Laboratories
  • - BioDelivery Sciences International
  • - Boehringer Ingelheim
  • - Cadence Pharmaceuticals
  • - Cara Therapeutics
  • - Caraco
  • - Cephalon
  • - Cerimon Pharmaceuticals
  • - Cumberland Pharmaceuticals
  • - Daiichi Sankyo
  • - Delex Therapeutics (subsidiary of YM Biosciences)
  • - Desitin Arzneimittel GmbH
  • - Dolorgiet
  • - Durect
  • - Elan
  • - Endo Pharmaceuticals
  • - Ethypharm SA
  • - GlaxoSmithKline
  • - Grünenthal
  • - Hisamitsu Pharmaceutical
  • - Hospira
  • - Ikano Therapeutics (formerly Intranasal Therapeutics)
  • - I-Flow Corporation
  • - Innocoll
  • - Insys Therapeutics
  • - Janssen (division of Ortho-McNeil-Janssen Pharmaceuticals)
  • - Janssen-Cilag (division of Johnson & Johnson)
  • - King Pharmaceuticals
  • - Kissei
  • - Labopharm
  • - Manx Pharma
  • - MAP Pharmaceuticals
  • - Maruho
  • - Meda Pharmaceuticals
  • - Menarini Group
  • - Merck & Co.
  • - Mika Pharma
  • - Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma
  • - Mundipharma
  • - Myriad Pharmaceuticals
  • - Napp Pharmaceuticals
  • - NeurogesX
  • - NovaDel
  • - Novartis
  • - NuPathe
  • - Nuvo
  • - Nycomed
  • - Omeros
  • - OptiNose
  • - Orphan Pharmaceutical
  • - Ortho-McNeil
  • - Pacira Pharmaceuticals
  • - Paion (formerly CeNeS)
  • - Pfizer
  • - Phosphagenics
  • - PriCara (division of Ortho-McNeil-Janssen Pharmaceuticals)
  • - ProStrakan
  • - Purdue Pharma
  • - QRxPharma
  • - Raptor Pharmaceutical
  • - Reckitt Benckiser
  • - Recordati
  • - Roche
  • - Sanofi-Aventis
  • - Sigma-Tau Pharmaceuticals
  • - Teikoku Seiyaku
  • - Therabel
  • - Transdel Pharmaceuticals
  • - Valeant Pharmaceuticals
  • - Vyteris
  • - Watson Pharmaceuticals
  • - YM BioSciences
  • - Zars Pharma
  • - Zogenix
Decision Resources Group brands include: